Monday, July 1, 2013

Sewing the Scalloped Peter Pan Collar on Simplicity 1609


I've been working a bit on my new version of Simplicity 1609, which will be in lime green gingham with a white pique collar. (I made the bow version in plaid last week.) The collar on this design is a Peter Pan collar with a twist--it has a scallop on either side on the front. Cute!

When sewing my collar this weekend, I noticed that the instructions for sewing the collar are a little scant. If I were a beginner and followed these instructions, I have a feeling I'd be confused and unhappy with my results. (Not ragging on the pattern here--I know they only have limited space!) So I thought I'd do a tutorial with more detail to help you out if you want to sew this pattern.

Here we go.

1. Select your interfacing. Choose a fusible interfacing that gives good support but isn't too stiff. For my lightweight pique, I choose Fashion Sewing Supply's Weft interfacing in white. I did samples on scraps with three interfacings before I decided on that one--be prepared to try a few and see which you like best!

2. Preshrink your interfacing, if necessary. I only use interfacings from the above source because they are preshrunk. If your interfacing shrinks after washing your garment, you will hate the effect and never want to wear it, trust me. You'll get ugly bubbles on your collar that won't iron out. To preshrink interfacing, put it in a bowl of warm water, let the water cool, and then hang the interfacing to dry.

3. Cut out four of the collar piece in your fashion fabric, and two in interfacing.

4. Apply interfacing to one set of the collar pieces. Use a presscloth to avoid mucking up your iron. Note: your interfaced collar pieces will be the top collar pieces, and then uninterfaced set will be the undercollars. These totally look the same, but the one on on the right is interfaced!




5. Pin one top collar to its undercollar piece, right sides together. Transfer the stitching line marks from the pattern; these will help you immensely. (If you don't want to dig out your pattern piece, you can just draw in a 3/8" stitching line around the scallop--that's all the marking is. It's there to help you figure out where to pivot when stitching.)



6. Stitch around the outer edges of your collar, pivoting at the scallop point. Note: The seam allowance here is 3/8", not your normal 5/8". 




7. Notch the curves and the scallop point. Where the curves are most extreme, you need to do a lot of notching. You can ease up on the notching on the less curvy curves. Around the scallop, make thin notches about every 3/8". Notch all the way to (but not through) the stitching lines.





8. Trim down the seam allowances to about 1/8". If you've notched all the way to the seamline, your tiny little notches will still be there.


9. Using a hard surface like a point presser (I'm guessing there are other household items that would work well too), press open those tiny seam allowances as best you can. You will need to keep maneuvering the collar around the surface to get where you need to press.





10. Turn the collar right side out. Use your fingers to turn the edges all the way out. It will look a little funny.


11. Remembering that the interfaced collar is the top collar, work from the underside of the collar, pressing it so that the seamline is nudged toward the underside so that it's not visible on the edge of the collar. Use lots of steam and don't press to hard--you don't want to flattern the collar. You may see some ripples from the fabric easing, but that's ok since it's on the bottom.

The top will be ripple-free, which is most important. (This is why you want the support of the interfacing on the top collar.)


12. Using a press cloth, steam the collar on the right side.
13. Baste the collar edges together. The seam allowances will be uneven because of how we pushed the seamline to the underside. Trim the undercollar seam allowance so that it matches the upper collar seam allowance.





14. Now it's ready to baste to your dress!



I know this looks like a lot of steps for one measly little collar, but they're worth it, I promise!

One last thing: I'm having a week-long 10% off sale in my fabric shop! Use coupon code HAPPY4TH until this Friday. I have the lime gingham above, new eyelet and polka dots, and more!



23 comments:

  1. Thanks for the tutorial!! Learned something new today.

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  2. Hi everyone, Just FYI...Gertie used our "Pro-Weft Supreme MEDIUM" Interfacing in Ivory (it's a *very* pale Ivory/off-white). It does NOT shrink, but it should be washed and dried on gentle/delicate and cool temp wash-dry cycles :)

    If you want interfacing with the same hand but that will take "stronger" washing...our new "Pro-Sheer MEDIUM" is a good choice and a lower price ;)

    Pam, from www.FashionSewingSupply.com

    {Don't miss the coupon-code located on the upper right side of Gertie's Blog(this page)}

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    1. Thank you for the info, Pam! I usually use the weft on wools, but I love how it worked on the cotton. I will keep your care info in mind. I'm going to get some of that pro sheer medium for next time. :)

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  3. This is a VERY helpful tutorial! Thank you.

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  4. Cool tutorial!
    www.thatssewnaija.blogspot.com

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  5. thank you for bringing up the importance of washing ones interfacing! I admit I hadn't thought to do that

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  6. It looks fabulous so far!! I can't wait to see it finished!!

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  7. I just started working on this dress, so thank you!

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  8. I just downloaded this pattern and I'm thrilled with your mini-tutorial. By the way, when are your next Butterick patterns coming out Gertie?

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    1. I have two coming out early fall! I will keep you updated!

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  9. Hi Gertie - I love this pattern and think you look just great in the black plaid! One big question though - I have this pattern myself and need to do a pretty big FBA on it. I just can't figure out how to do a FBA on a pattern with a curved french dart. I'm thinking that I should rotate the french dart to another spot, do the FBA, and then rotate it back?
    Ok, two big questions - there's no bust point printed on the pattern. Do I guess?
    Thanks -

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, I would definitely rotate the dart to do the FBA. For me, the bust point was about 1/2" beyond the end point of the bust dart. Hope that helps!

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    2. Thanks - that helps a lot!

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  10. I've been doing a bunch of turned collars lately and I trim about 3/16 off the under-collar first. Then sew around it with that smaller piece on top, stretching it a little bit to fit onto the main, interfaced collar piece. When you turn it right-side out, the edge seam will roll to the underside very easily =) It's a little tricky to sew a smaller piece to a large one, especially with scallops, but it gives a lovely edge.

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  11. thank you so much for the tutorial!

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  12. Thanks for the tip on shrinking the interfacing! i never would have thought it was possible because of the glue.

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  13. I always appreciate your tutorials. I was just wondering if you ever under stitch. I find that though it is an extra step, it actually speeds things up for me in the pressing. The collar rolls beautifully over the top. I know that you can't stitch all the way around when making a scalloped edge, but I go as close to the pivot as I can.

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  14. Thank you for the fabulous instructions! Peter Pan collars are on my to-do list.

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  15. Thank you! I have been oogling this pattern in my stash for the past few weeks. When I saw that you were making the same dress I was super excited. I am a self taught, not so much a beginner any more, who always needs lots of advice. I can't wait to make this dress with the peter pan color now! Thank you :-)

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  16. I love this little summery dress--I can imagine wearing this and sitting on a porch drinking iced teas! Thanks for sharing!

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  17. :) Thank you for all the help! Much appreciated

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  18. Hey there.
    I love you work and have your fantastic book! I recently bought your Butterick's 5895 pattern. I am having so much trouble with the collar and when I did a bit of troubleshooting I noticed quite a few people also struggled with it. I don't suppose you have any hints or a tutorial? Anything would be greatly appreciated :)

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Thanks for your comments; I read each and every one! xo Gertie

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