Thursday, November 17, 2011

Raglan Sleeve Coat Innards (It's Aliiiive!)

Kind of scary looking, huh? My coat fabric is a lovely double-faced wool and angora blend, with one side being light robin's egg blue and the other a pale lime color. I'm only using the blue side, but you can see here how the right and wrong sides work in this pattern.

Here's a close-up of the back neck. The directions called for a length of twill tape to stabilize the neckline.

I'm having trouble getting the top seam on the raglan sleeves to lay flat. Do you think a clapper would help? I don't have one of those contraptions, but maybe it's time to invest in one.

Here's the facing and pocket inside. I finished the backs of the bound buttonholes by making little windows with silk organza patches and then hand stitching the windows around the buttonhole openings.
You can also see the inside of the welt pockets. They have a self-fabric facing and a pocket bag made out of the lining fabric.

Speaking of lining! You may wonder why the heck I haven't finished this coat yet. Well, there was a lining mishap. I was a little short on the polka dot charmeuse, and the store I bought it from doesn't have any more. The horror! I ended up buying a solid charmeuse to supplement. And then I spent a while obsessing over how the shades of peachy beige don't exactly match each other.

But the reality is that I only have to cut one lining piece from the solid: the sleeve front. Which means it will hardly ever show. Which means I need to get over myself and finish this damn coat.

Oh! I also bought gloves! Aren't they pretty?

They're a sort of plummy pink that looks lovely with the light blue.

Readers, what would you have done in the lining situation I had? Start over with an entirely new lining so it would all match? Or maybe you would have been wise and bought enough lining to begin with. (I did read the envelope! I swear!) Would it drive you crazy if one sleeve piece was solid and the rest of the lining was a print?

94 comments:

  1. Clearly, you should hand-paint or embroider polka dots on the solid fabric before making the sleeve lining. :)

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  2. It would drive me bonkers to have one piece not match. But I'm very anal. Love your coat. Can't wait to see you modeling it.

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  3. I was going to say that it would annoy me to have a mismatched lining, but deal with it vs. redoing the entire lining, but I love Sally's comment so much that I'll have to second it!

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  4. I have several friends who used to work in the atelier of (clothing co that was a very big deal some years back) and whenever something like this happened, they worked with it and it became a 'design feature.' Many of my pieces have very special design features.

    I would have cut the entire sleeve lining from the second type of lining -- look, a design feature!

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  5. Gertie, it would entirely depend on how much of the original lining I had completed/cut out before I discovered I was short. In this case, since you are talking about a different sleeve lining...it really is not going to show hardly at all - even when you do take your coat off. Vive la difference!

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  6. I have several shop bought coats which use different lining fabrics for the sleeves and the main body of the lining. So while I'd keep the beautiful polka dot fabric for the main lining, I'd probably have both sleeve fronts in the solid to keep it symetrical... otherwise, I fear it might bug me whenever I put the coat on, even if nobody else could ever see it!

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  7. It's looking great! If it were me, I'd cut the whole sleeve from the plain lining rather than just the fronts. I think this would look more like it was deliberately done and less like you ran out and had to mish-mash with different fabrics! You could maybe find somewhere to incorporate a little of the plain lining somehow to bring them together, perhaps a piping between the lining and coat facings?

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  8. I would have to track down the polka dot charmeuse. It would absolutely drive me insane!!! I am very anal about stuff like that though. I don't blame you for being annoyed about it. I love the coat!!!!

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  9. I'd do something balanced like both sleeves in the solid or something like that.

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  10. It would probably bother me at first that the lining didn't match, but once I wore it a few times and got compliments on how great it looked from the outside I wouldn't care. By the way, it looks fantastic.

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  11. It makes the coat truly yours. I would have gone with it and not stressed and enjoyed the beautifully unique outcome.

    I also refuse to knit pick. I cover knitting misses with flowers and beads when they're easily worked in.

    More like an adventure and less like a chore this way.... Yes?

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  12. This is definitely a 'design feature' *wink* ! Although if I'm being honest, I would probably cut the entire sleeve lining from the solid, and the rest from the spotted fabric. But I can be my own worst enemy sometimes when it comes to making extra work for myself.
    @ Sally - love that suggestion....!!

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  13. I would most likely search in vain for more polka dot...at the same time keeping my eyes open for a new equally fabulous charmeuse...but after exhaustive efforts, do exactly what you would do and I would laugh a little every time I looked into the sleeve:)

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  14. i think a clapper would help with flattening those seams. you'd be surprised how far a little clapper-smacking goes! plus, a clapper is just useful for all kinds of pressing goodies. invest invest!

    i think you did fine with the situation you found yourself in - i would have done the same (different sleeve lining). no one is ever going to see the sleeve lining anyway! and you can pretend like it was something you meant to do :)

    the coat looks lovely, btw. can't wait to see it complete!

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  15. If it were me, I'd do the entire sleeve in the solid. As for the raglan sleeve seam, a clapper may help and notch the seam. It looks like a slightly curved seam to me and notching should do the trick.

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  16. Please tell me you bought that double faced wool online so I can buy some too!!! LOVE IT! Seriously amazing coat!

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  17. That double-faced wool is so pretty, it would be great for a reversible cape or something unlined too so both shades can be seen!

    As for the lining, it would annoy me too to have one sleeve different I would probably have to make both sleeves plain to look symmetrical.

    Looking forward to more coat posts!

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  18. I'd use the two different linings and not be bothered but the question is will it really bother you?

    Love those gloves!!!!

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  19. i would have just gone with it, knowing that if i had hit a roadblock like that, it could easily be months before i got back around to fixing it :-) can't wait to see your finished coat!

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  20. Yes, I would totally obsess about the lining. I probably would do both sleeves in the solid.

    You know in Victorian times, ladies always purposefully put at least one mistake into their needlework because only Christ could be perfect and they considered it a sacrilege to make a perfect piece.

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  21. It would annoy me! Just make the other sleeve lining plain too. At least then it would be sort of intentional.

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  22. Those polka dots are awesome. The mismatched lining may bug me slightly but not using that awesome polka dot and having to buy more of a less cool fabric would bother me more. I think it's totally fine inside your sleeve. :)

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  23. Hehe... I think after a break from the coat, and the lining, you'll hardly notice that it doesn't quite perfectly match!

    I wouldn't let a mis-matching lining stop me - my first thought would be to make a horizontal divide, so that from for example hip-level and down, it is all the same lining. But using your almos matching lining for the front sleeves, which totally almost never shows, I think is one of the best things you could have done.

    Plus, as long as it's symmetrical, it looks much more intentional!

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  24. If possible, I would probably have sewn sleeves out of three pieces: polka dot on top and bottom and solid one in the middle whe it's never shown. If that wouldn't have been possible, I've done the sleeves out of solid fabric, like so many others here. :)

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  25. I made my clapper with a board, a piece of linen and a drawer handle. Probably not as good as a bought one, but I had everything, didn't spend an extra penny and have been happy with it for 10 years. I'm a cheap old biddy.

    Regarding the lining; I've had this problem. When this happens (I make almost all my patterns so there is no one to tell me how much to get)I turn it into a design feature because I am a Recovering Perfectionist and undesigned asymmetry would drive me nuts every time I put it on, compliments or no compliments. So, being me, I would probably change the lining pattern and create a design feature smack in the center back of the lining. Not only does this take care of the couldn't find more fabric problem, but it also copes with the not quite the right color problem. I learned in college that if you have a 'mistake' make it big (loved the flowers over missed stitches in knitting). Then it looks like you designed it that way =)

    Oh, and I hand sew down stubborn seams (and shouldn't that seam be taped anyway?--two in one)

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  26. Oh, and check out he book "Easy, Easier, Easiest Tailoring" by Pati Palmer and Susan Pletsch. The bit on bound buttonholes is VERY enlightening.

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  27. Regarding the seams, clip a bit more and definitely buy the clapper!

    On the lining, I'd maybe try to cut the pieces of plain lining and dotted lining so they're in the same place on both sleeves, or maybe just go for it and use it whereever it falls. Go wild!! Be different!

    I'm sure it's going to be lovely once it's done. And if someone is looking at the lining while you're wearing the coat, say 'Isn't it cool? It's truly one of a kind!'

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  28. Yes, it would drive me crazy if one sleeve piece was solid and the rest was print, but if I cut an extra sleeve piece from the solid to make the lining symmetrical, it wouldn't bother me.

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  29. I have a coat with different lining in the sleeves, so I would maybe go for something similar to the new (incredible nice) gloves you just bought? Or just use the none-polka-dotted for the whole sleeve. I have some black polka-dot lining laying ready for a coat, but the shop didn't have enough of it, so I already then bought another piece of lining for the sleeves.

    I also think a clapper would do, just make sure you put something between the seam allowance and the main fabric, so you won't clap a groove into the coat! I would probably wet a piece of cloth and steamed the allowance down (again with another piece of cloth laying in between the seam allowance and the main fabric).

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  30. Ok, now that I've read the comments, I must say that I like both Sally and Elegant Obasan's comments. Now, I'm having visions of writing a poem on your solid with discharge paste...

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  31. I would make both sleeve linings out of the solid

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  32. Hey Gertie,

    I actually have some of that fabric. I'll be in the garment district on Saturday and I'd be happy to bring you some if you were able to meet up.

    -Cindy

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  33. When we look for inspiration in times of trouble, we go the St Paul and The Beatles. I quote: "Life is very short, and there's no tiiiiiime for fussing and fighting my friend. I have always thought that it's a criiiime so I will ask you once again" From We can Work it Out. Here endeth the lesson ;-)
    It's a bit of sleeve lining. Meh. :)

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  34. It's inside the sleeve, and no-one will ever notice! Even you - because you will not see it! But doing both sleeves in the solid is an excellent idea too. If it were me, that would make everything happy again.

    Don't feel bad about not buying enough. I just ordered fabric for one of those Simplicity project runway patterns that gives you separate yardage for each element of the piece. I thought 2 yards was an amazing deal for a jacket, until I realized the sleeves were not included in that calculation. Of course, I had already ordered my 2 yards of wool before I realised my mistake, and had to order more! So... some of us are more challenged than others.

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  35. I agree with Maris Olsen's comment and I REALLY like MRSC's comment. You must find lining that coordinates, or a lining that contrasts. Cut both sleeves from that second lining and MOVE ON. It will look great. And Sally's comment isn't out of line, either! A pencil eraser and some fabric paint will quickly make those polka dots. (I'd be the one to paint dots of a different color for the sleeve piece).

    Adding unusual details to the lining is a great way to add an artistic, personal touch to your project.

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  36. Making it into a design feature seems like a good idea. Sally's just might be better :)

    You could also try letting the coat hang for a while, so the seam lies flat. Just leave it on the stand until you have finished the polka dots ... ideally next to the shower. You could also take the time to steam it.

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  37. honestly, when are you going to turn your sleeves inside out??? to make it more like you meant to do it that way, just make both sleeves in the solid color and save the polka dot fabric for the rest. And I'm sure that in the depths of the coat, it will hardly show that they don't exactly match. It looks lovely though! I do hope you finish it soon :)

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  38. I would have used the plain for both the sleeves and the polka dots for everything else. At least this way there's a little symmetry.

    But also, I'd be too lazy to care and would basically start the plain fabric where the polka dot fabric ended.

    I've done this many times before. I always get not enough fabric. I think my friends believe its my style to have mismatching lining, but then again they don't really see lining unless i take the thing off. So there's also something to think about as well.

    The coat looks beautiful! I can't wait for you to finish it! =)

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  39. I love your blog. Thought I'd say that before ready any other of the posts.

    In 40+ years of sewing, the one thing I've learned is never, ever follow the pattern yardage amounts for lining. I have no idea why, but if I DO follow the yardage amounts on the pattern back, I barely have enough lining to do the project. Instead, I always add at least one yard to them while shopping.

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  40. i'm new to sewing, so not sure if I am going to get the terms right, but at first glance, I would echo what most of the comments are saying, entire sleeves in the solid fabric, I would pipe the seam (not sure if that is the right term) with a fabric that matches the glove color,
    then in the center back in the lining where the tag of designer label would go, I would make a square of the solid fabric and make your own "label" possibly embroider in the color of the gloves, if you have left over polka dot, I would add them to the glove lining if possible :) I remember my mothers fur coat from the early sixties had this amazing pink lining, and it had her signature embroidered in it as a label, I always thought it was fab.

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  41. I got a lovely coat recently (yes it's bought, not handmade, but it was just too perfect to pass) that has the body lined in a really nice printed cotton and the sleeves lined with a more slippery polyester fabric in a matching solid color. Only the last 10~15cm of the sleeves lining is made of the printed cotton fabric, so that it's cute when showing. I don't know if you have enough of both of your fabrics to do this, but it could be a nice "design feature" as thruthbeautylovealchemy said. I like this better than the "just one piece of the sleeve lining doesn't match" solution.

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  42. Clappers are just hunks of wood. But when I made a heavy wool coat in a sewing class we hand sewing down some of our seams to get them to sit where we wanted.

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  43. It's happened to all of us at one time or another. Even worse is when you've been serging a tiered skirt and you accidentally chop a piece out of your skirt from a misstep. I just did that, and I didn't have the fabric to cut another piece, so I carefully patched it with a scrap and nobody has noticed yet!

    Seriously, though, it'll be your little secret that the lining inside one sleeve is different.

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  44. Like you, I would have bought something, pondered about it, pondered some more, and then just went ahead and used it for spots you can't see.

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  45. I would have done exactly as you with the lining...and geez, even I have a clapper!

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  46. little imperfections 1) keep you sane, and 2) keep your garments from looking like they were made by the factory-machine. all handmade garments have flaws, regardless of what anyone would like to say about being "anal" or OCD. those types of things are what make handmade items so priceless and unique.

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  47. Haha... I love the idea of calling it "design features" =D

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  48. Lovely coat, you will look smashing in it! Re:Clapper, mine was a gift and I've had it for years. I have to tell you I love it to bits. Once you've used it (and adored the results) it is hard to go back! Lining? I vote for the "design feature"----- yes the perfect element!

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  49. I would obssess about the solid piece for five minutes then be thrilled I had found a solution and would still be able to use the polka dot lining.

    I love the gloves. I love brightly coloured leather gloves. They are just fabulous and will look gorgeous with your coat.

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  50. I would make both sleeves solid color.

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  51. I love that green! The blue is very nice too. Great choice! :)

    Even if no one else could see the difference in lining it would still drive me crazy. I'm a funky mix-match artist but certain things just poke at my perfectionist side.
    Got to find some cotton lining material. Can't wear the polyester stuff :(

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  53. 1. Your shoulder seams need to be understitched...can't tell if they are, or not. Also bound, if you can. It makes everything work and feel better!!
    2. You need a HAM to press the shoulder seams well. Clapper is optional.
    3. I would find a matching color...(navy, maybe??) but different fabric from my stash for the sleeves - both front and back. If my stash didnt have something that worked, I'd suck it up and roll with your plan, but trying to make it planned-looking. Then I would feel good about my work!

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  54. Where is it written every thing must match. It is your coat and now your design. There are time when i am so happy to NOT be a perfectionist. I used to love using strange linings for jackets and adding some of that fabric to a blouse or dress.

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  55. Having two fabrics for the lining would become a design feature. I'd maybe buy a bit extra to do both sleeves the same or something like that. Someone at some point will see this and say "Wow, what a cool idea to line the sleeves with a different lining! You're SOOOO creative." Just say thank you. :)

    Remember, finished is better than perfect.

    Buy the clapper already!!!

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  56. No, it would not drive me crazy. I would think of it as a charming detail/secret that made my hand-tailored garment that much more unique!

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  57. It wouldn't drive me crazy. Although i'd consider making it symmetrical. I just made a jacket where i used a different lining for the sleeves than for the body of the jacket, but that was deliberate because i wanted slippery lining on the sleeves, but had a cotton print for the rest.

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  58. Very nice, as you progress be sure & show us your feather stitch because they looked great.

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  59. It drives me crazy when things don't match.

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  60. It would not drive me crazy at all. In fact, the little quirks always make me really happy. This is such a pretty color!

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  61. I second some of the earlier advices: cut the entire sleeve in the different lining. In fact, one of my RTW coats are done that way; printed lining where visible but plain in the sleeves.

    Also: A clapper might be a good idea. I'd press the seam on a tailor's ham, add some extra pressure with a clapper and then when the seam is flat I'd lightly catchstitch the seamallowance to the fabric. Good luck, and I'm sure it will be lovely!

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  62. I am currently in the middle of making my second Crepe dress, this time with the original fabric I bought to make it in at the end of last year. It needed lining though, and I found something else ;) So, I am making it, and underlining it, with a plain muslin. Which I am going to run out of. I went to the store to buy more last week & they didn't have any :( So I have bought a slightly heavier weave for the skirt, and hope it all goes well!

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  63. Oh and about that raglan seam not sitting flat, clip and notch, clip and notch! Heavy fabric like that has no way of settling down without a bit of encouragement. I reckon it needs notching not just clipping too. Good luck!

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  64. Sarah huggiedoeshomespun@wordpress.comNovember 18, 2011 at 6:10 AM

    Don't sweat it, the sleeve lining will be one of those things that a week after you've finished making to coat you totally forget about. I find the finickety urges calm down when an item is finished!

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  65. Maybe this is already suggested but another option is to use the polka dot lining near the cuffs and the solid lining on the upper sleeve at the shoulders. The easy way to do that is to piece the fabric together with a horizontal seam mid sleeve and then cut out he pattern pieces

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  66. Nobody is going to see the sleeve lining! Maybe do both sleeve linings with the solid, so you know they are the same. So not a big deal IMO :) Love the coat, it is beautiful

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  67. I love my clapper! It's kind of like a magic wand for fabrics. I've been working with some very difficult rain wear fabric for a trench coat and have found there's a lot you can do with some steam, a bit of pressure in the right spot and a clapper. :-)

    As for the sleeves, I think I'd want both sleeves to be the same, not just have one odd piece, but I wouldn't mind them being different from the coat body. How about making them COMPLETELY different, like that pink from your gloves?

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  68. I agree with what Nathalie said - use the polka dots for the main lining and use the plain for both sleeves.

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  69. To second many others, it'd drive me nuts to have one sleeve in a different lining, but both sleeves I could live with.

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  70. I would take Cindy up on her offer of the matching fabric!
    If that does not work for some reason, then I would do both sleeves in the solid, so that they match. Using the two different fabrics in a way that looks intentional would not bother me, but using the solid on only one sleeve would drive me crazy!

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  71. This would not bother me in the least!

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  72. I would hand cross/catch stitch the raglan seam allowance down, making sure to only catch a few fibers of the wool so that you won't see any puckering on the outside. A clapper would help a little bit, but with the thickness of wool, the seam allowances won't stay down unless you stitch them down.

    ~Sarah K.

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  73. Such a nice coat. I agree, clipping, steaming, and clapping. This will work. Don't worry. Best,BER

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  74. Regarding getting those seam allowances to lie flat - catchstich, baby! I'm in the midst of making a maternity coat for a friend and the wool is really thick. I started off just catchstitching the sleeve seams so she wouldn't feel the bumps inside (she has enough Bump already!), but I got kinda addicted and catchstitched ALL the seam allowances to the flannel underlining. Your wool is definitely heavy enough to take the stitching and not show through the other side.

    And as for linings? I've done different sleeve linings to the body All The Time! I get so many comments on how designer they look, and having snoop-shopped myself, yeah - all the really pricey designer coats do that. :)

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  75. This probably wouldn't bother me, but I haven't quite gotten the insides to look as good as the outsides yet on anything I sew. And getting this far, I would never undo it and sew it again. It would never ever get finished. But that's just me.

    I kept thinking that you could try something that is obviously intentional. Can you find some white with peach polka dots for a contrast? Or stripes? Something fun...

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  77. good grief these things happen to me too- about being too short on the lining-i think you told me once that you like it when things aren't all that perfect! You are the only one ( oh and all of us that read your blog!) that knows about that sleeve.... let it go- get your lovely coat done and enjoy it!!!!
    It is beautiful, inside and out!

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  78. Love. This. Coat. Everything about it. I am heading over to Paron's (virtually, anyway) right now! I love your blog!

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  79. I think I too would do both sleeves in the solid but would not make the whole lining over again. Just one sleeve wouldn't show but I would KNOW.

    And about not exactly matching colours: Only once I did a test jacket for my boy because those patterns used to be rather erratic in size and I didn't want to risk my expensive fabric. So I used scraps of whatever I had, did some machine embroidery (to test designs and hide some awful sewing mistakes like holes from seam ripping) and meant to throw it away once it has served its purpose. To my eyes it was really looking ... wild. A friend of mine liked it so much that I finished it for her. It has been handed around for five years now and now is definitely and finally falling apart. And I am still not over those mismatched colours. To me they are like 'burgers with candy syrup. Yikes.

    And a clapper definitely is a great thing. I got one of those combined contraptions where you also can turn and iron shirt collars. No idea what they are called but I just love it. But then I am sewing Christmas shirts for my three men right now. 2 each and pants to follow.

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  80. It would make me a little crazy, especially after that much work. But I could definately live with two sleeves from the second fabric, as suggested above.

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  81. I've had a couple of mishaps of that nature, but as much as I like when my garments come out looking "professional" I like the character is gives to have a little different piece of lining. It makes it special! Plus, if no one will ever see it, unless you are a person who is significantly disturbed by unevenness or mismatches in life, it really doesn't matter!

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  82. i would make both the sleeves in the plain fabric as just one panel would drive me mad. Can't wait to see it finished

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  83. i would cut both sleeves from the solid fabric and keep the main body poka dot just so when you take the coat off and sometimes the sleeves pull through they will both be the same xoxo

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  84. Referring to Sally,
    you could test the solid charmeuse to see if it takes bleach. You can use household bleach,paint a tiny dot onto a scrap. Compare it with the polka dots, if it is too strong, water it down and test again. Then make a polka dot stencil and paint on the beach with a paintbrush or sponge. But yes it would drive me crazy, however I know I would still go ahead and mix and match!

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  85. I see others thought the same thing I did: cut both sleeves out of the solid : )

    The gloves are gorgeous!

    Sarah

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  86. My sewing idol Marcy Tilton once said there are no mistakes only design opportunities. With lining it's ok to add a companion fabric.
    In relation to your raglan seam allowance not laying flat you could loosely stitch it to the body of the coat with an overcast type stitch. Your fabric is dense enough so it won,t show through. What a great job you are doing for the sewing world.
    Mary Glenn

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  87. You are so talented and your work is so neat! I love your gloves too they are a gorgeous colour! XxxX

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  88. I'd have recut the sleeves in the solid. I don't know that I'd like the 1 piece in solid even if it won't show often. But I could totally do the whole sleeve in a solid.

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  89. You don't need to buy a clapper. Just steam your seams and smack it with something wooden.

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  90. I think that I would at least cut out the sleeves the same! But... since some lovely sweet reader has given you some... you are set! The gloves are really something! No one will miss at all!
    Enjoy your get away!

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  91. I would use the mismatched lining, but only symmetrically, that is, if I had enough of the polka dots for everything but one piece in one sleeve, I would make the same piece of the other sleeve in the same solid lining, even if there was still enough polka dot for that one. This is because I wouldn't have the patience to make everything from scratch again in a new fabric, but I also am pretty obsessive about consistency, and I think making it symmetrical would make me feel better. It would look almost like it was on purpose.

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  92. I've totally had this happen before. I would have gone with two sleeves solid and the rest with the original. The coat looks great

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  93. uhmm can I just say that you're amazing! I wish I could sew as much and as awesomely as you!

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Thanks for your comments; I read each and every one! xo Gertie

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