Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Drafting a Simple Band Sleeve


This sleeve is great when you wish you'd drafted a bodice with kimono sleeves, but you didn't realize that until the bodice was already cut and assembled. No problem! This simple little sleeve mimics the look of a short kimono sleeve, but you can cut it on a different grain than the bodice for some visual interest. (See the finished dress modeled here.)

As the name implies, it's just a simple band. It doesn't have a cap or require any easing. It's wider at the shoulder and then tapers to very narrow underneath the arm.



Here's how you do it. Measure your front and back armholes, excluding the seam allowances. (Double click pictures to see the text better.)


Start drafting. You'll have a line the length of your total armhole, with the center marked with a circle.

Now draw the outer curve.


Finish up the pattern.

Cut four of your sleeve pattern, 2 for the shell and 2 for the lining. Stitch each set together along the curved line, right sides together. Understitch the lining.  Stitch the short ends together and press open. Flip sleeve right side out and press. Baste the raw edges together and then treat it as one.

Sew your sleeve in as usual, but don't worry about easing, as it should fit exactly. Match your circle up to your shoulder seam. I finished the raw edge with my serger to keep it very neat.


 That's all! Let me know if you have any questions.

34 comments:

  1. Very clear explanation Gertie, love this dress:)

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  2. i'm loving the fancy graphics

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  4. Simple application, and a nice addition to a shell! It'd be cute to do this in a wide scalloped lace trim too, don't you think?

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  5. Awesome. I love band sleeves. I've fudged them before but maybe this will encourage me to do them right.

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  6. I was just about to Google sleeve drafting. Thanks for the clear explanation!

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  7. How cute! The dress is lovely and the brooch, stunning. I am thinking how cute this would be with a little contrast piping. Thanks.

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  8. Love this, Gertie! I bet this technique would look great with stripes. Love how clear the illustrations are. And also, the dress looks great on you!

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  9. Thanks for this!! I'm sure I'll put it to good use.

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  10. I'd love to see a photo of someone modeling this top--I think I know how the band sleeves would look on a real person, but I'm not quite certain.

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  11. You make it all seem so simple- this is really awesome!
    Thanks!

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  12. FABULOUS!! THANKYOU SO MUCH!
    Px

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  13. Thanks! Very clear and easy to understand. I know a bodice that I am definitely going to use this for.

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  14. This is great Gertie, exactly what I was after, thank you so much. x

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  15. Wonderful! its so useful to have these tips - thank you :) would there be any chance of tips on adding a collar to a collarless jacket in the future...here's hoping!

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  16. Thanks so much for the tutorial. May I ask what program you use to make the illustrations?

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  17. how did you know I needed this?
    So a dress that i could only wear on weekends now can go to work!

    What out sewing machine I'm coming for you this weekend

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  18. Interesting. I wonder how the stiffness of the fabric will affect the look on the body. I think I feel some experimentation coming on! Thank you for the tutorial.

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  19. Thanks for the tip! I'm totally trying this :)

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  20. I LOVE this fabric - where is it from and what is it called please!! x

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  21. Glad you like the tutorial, ladies!

    KWu, I added a link to the post where I modeled the dress. See the first paragraph.

    Butterfly, I use Snagit.

    Stacia, I bought the fabric online from Emma One Sock, but it's sold out! :(

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  22. Just curious - do you join the short (1") ends at some point in the process, or do you overlap them somehow while setting in the sleeve? I don't see a seam in the photo that shows the inside of the bottom of the sleeve.

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  23. Eileen, thank you for the great catch! I added the step where you stitch the short ends together; it's before you set in the sleeve. Sorry for the oversight!

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  24. wonderful! It will be great for adding sleeves to these beautiful but sleeveless tops. Thanks!

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  25. Thank you SOOOOOO much! This will prove very useful in my sewing world.

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  26. Gretchen, this post was VERY timely indeed. You solved an issue for me and I've just used this technique in a remaking of a historic (for me) dress. Here's a post about my experiences using your technique! http://renaissancebombshell.blogspot.com/2011/11/grand-maternity-dress.html

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  27. That was so clever! I use to choose non sleeveless dresses becaus of not liking my shoulders. But if I buy a vintage dress I could trim it with a matching fabric with this method. Thanks!

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  28. I will be sewing this one today, exactly what I was looking for... thank you!

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  29. Thank you , Now my only problem is a color.

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  30. Excellent tutorial. I was really happy to see emphasis on the importance of a center mark! You made the tutorial very easy to follow and understand. We'd love to feature this tutorial @ Sew-Whats-New.com

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  31. Hi Gertie, I just drafted this little sleeve with a slight modification and it went fine. Thanks for the tutorial! I set a link to your website in my blog, I hope that's o.k. for you?
    Greetings from Switzerland:
    berry

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Thanks for your comments; I read each and every one! xo Gertie

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